Your Web Browser explained

We all love to Surf the web and this is made possible by Web browsers. Browsers are basically software programs that allow you to search for and view various kinds of information on the Web.  Do you really know everything about your Browsers? Here is the break down;

15 June 2015

Your Web Browser explained

We all love to Surf the web and this is made possible by Web browsers. Browsers are basically software programs that allow you to search for and view various kinds of information on the Web.  Do you really know everything about your Browsers? Here is the break down;

Web Browser break down

We all know what a Web browser looks like, but its a good idea to understand the various parts of the browsers if not for reference but to fully utilise their full potential.  The parts of a browser include:

  • Address bar: This is the box at the top of your browser window that displays the entire URL, or Web site address, i.e. (http://bbc.co.uk)
  • Status bar: This is the box at the bottom of your browser window. The status bar displays all sorts of information, depending on what you're doing at the time, but mostly it's for showing load speed and the URL of whatever address your mouse is hovering over.
  • Toolbar Icons: The toolbar and its icons are at the top of your browser window right underneath the Title Bar. This is where you'll see the Back button, the Home button, the Refresh button, etc.
  • Display Window: The Display Window is just a fancy term for your browser work space; it's were you see the content of the website and takes up the majority of the browser window.
  • Scroll Bars: If you've ever been to a website that you had to "scroll down" to read something, then you've used the scroll bars. They're just directional/ navigational aids.
  • Back/Forward Buttons: The back and forward buttons look like arrows.  They're located on the top left corner of the Internet Explorer window. Clicking the Back button allows you to navigate back to a page that you have viewed previously. Clicking the Forward button returns to sites that you viewed before you used the Back button.
  • Compatibility View, Refresh and Stop Buttons: The Compatibility View button, which looks like a sheet of paper torn in half, is next to the address bar and is used for websites that were designed for older browsers. Clicking this button corrects errors such as buttons, images or text boxes that are not formatted correctly.  Next to the Compatibility View button is also the Refresh button (a semi-circular arrow), which allows you to reload a Web page, and the Stop button (an X), which cancels the loading of a Web page that is in progress.
  • Tabs: To the right of the address bar is the tabs section that allows you to open multiple Web pages at the same time. Clicking on a tab allows you to navigate to the Web page without closing any of the other pages that you have opened. Tabs can be re-arranged by clicking and dragging the tab to the position you want it to be on the row.
  • Home, Favourite and Tools Buttons: On the top right of the browser window, The Home button, which looks like a house, immediately takes you to the Web page that you have designed as your "Home" page the page that opens every time you start the browser. When clicked, the star-shaped Favourites button brings up a drop-down menu displaying a list of Web pages that you have marked as favourites and also allows you to add new pages to this list. The Tools gear button displays a drop-down menu with all the commands like saving, printing and options.

If you are unable to see any of these bars or icon, on the menu bar click View>Toolbars and select the ones you wish to use.

There's lots more information if you want to get into the nuts and bolts of a Web browser, but these parts are the basic ones that anyone should be aware of, they may differ slightly depending on the browser.  Now that you understand your browser elements, you can utilise them for an improved internet browsing experience.  

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